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Posts tagged "Workplace Discrimination"

Court brief sides with transgender worker

Transgender workers in Massachusetts and throughout the United States should be protected by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. This is according to a brief submitted to the Supreme Court by the Transgender Legal Defense & Education Fund. The brief claims that discriminating against a transgender person is tantamount to sex discrimination, which Title VII prohibits. It backs up its claim by pointing to favorable rulings in 35 federal district courts over the past 20 years.

LGBTQ employees likely to witness or experience discrimination

A survey by Glassdoor found that 53 percent of employees who are LGBTQ have witnessed or experienced anti-LGBTQ statements by people they work with. For employees in Massachusetts, such behavior could rise to the level of actionable discrimination. Around 30 percent of non-LGBTQ employees said they had witnessed the same sort of statements. According to a group leader with Glassdoor, 26 states do not have protections on the books for LGBTQ workers. Many employees believe coming out to employers and co-workers could negatively impact their careers.

Goldman Sachs sued over alleged LGBT discrimination

Many LGBT employees in Massachusetts continue to struggle with discrimination in the workplace even after they have reached a significant amount of career success. This is underlined in a lawsuit by a former Goldman Sachs vice president who is suing the Wall Street bank for workplace discrimination. He says that he was fired from his job in retaliation for complaining about discriminatory behavior aimed at him because of his sexual orientation. The openly gay banker was part of the company's LGBT network before his dismissal.

Americans think age plays a role in career success

Employers in Massachusetts are generally barred from using age when making employment decisions. According to a recent poll, however, roughly half of the respondents said that age discrimination takes place in the workplace. However, about 60% of respondents who are 60 or older say that older workers are frequently the target of such discrimination. Conversely, only 43% of respondents who were 45 or younger said the same thing.

Ageism is a common problem at work

A new survey has found that 11% of workers over the age of 45 have experienced ageism on the job. This is in spite of the fact that it is illegal for employers in Massachusetts and elsewhere to discriminate based on a worker's age. Discrimination can take many forms such as not getting hired for a job or being demoted by an employer. It is generally accepted that ageism begins when a worker approaches age 50.

Protecting older individuals from age discrimination

Massachusetts residents may have seen an increase in the number of employees who are 65 years old and older. There are a number of reasons for this increase. One reason has to do with the fact that people are simply living longer. This means seniors are worried that they may actually burn out their retirement savings before they die. This increase in older workers entering the workforce has not changed the hiring policies of a lot of companies.

Ageism is not going away

Workers in Massachusetts and throughout the country are generally protected against age discrimination. However, this doesn't mean that employers don't factor in age when deciding who to keep or terminate. Recent lawsuits against companies such as Citibank and IBM show that even large companies are not immune to this practice. One man tried to change his legal age from 69 to 49, citing age discrimination as one of his motivations for doing so.

Taking action after seeing an illegal job posting

A posting for a job in Massachusetts or anywhere else in the country must meet certain guidelines. For instance, it generally cannot be discriminatory against a protected class. Furthermore, postings cannot claim that a worker will be an independent contractor if he or she is actually treated like an employee. This is important partially because independent contractors are required to withhold their own taxes, and they also aren't entitled to insurance or other benefits like employees are.

Time's Up supports healthcare workers fighting sexual harassment

The healthcare sector forms a significant part of the economy in Massachusetts. Healthcare workplaces have also been identified as hotbeds of sexual harassment. The Time's Up movement that originally formed in 2018 to help people in the entertainment industry combat sexual harassment has expanded operations to support healthcare workers. The movement's leadership made this move in response to the large numbers of medical workers who asked the organization for legal help.

Discrimination lawsuit filed against Oracle

The tech industry in Massachusetts and all over the country continues to face claims of discrimination against women and minorities. According to a complaint filed by the Department of Labor, discriminatory practices at leading tech company Oracle have cost black, Asian and female employees more than $400 million in lost wages over a four-year period.

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